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Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Dancing eyes-dancing feet syndrome


Other Names for this Disease

  • Infantile polymyoclonus
  • Kinsbourne syndrome
  • OMS
  • Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome
  • Polymyoclonus infantile
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Overview

Dancing eyes-dancing feet syndrome, also known as opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome (OMS), is a rare neurologic disorder characterized by ocular (eye), behavioral, sleep, and language problems. The onset is usually abrupt, often severe, and can become chronic.[1] OMS typically occurs in association with tumors (neuroblastomas), or following a viral infection.[2][3][4] Treatment may include corticosteroids or ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone). When there is a tumor present, treatment may include chemotherapy, surgery, and/or radiation. When the underlying cause of OMS is treated, symptoms may improve.[2] Relapses are common and may occur without warning.[2][3]
Last updated: 4/16/2014

References

  1. Pranzatelli MR. Opsoclonus-Myoclonus Syndrome. National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). 2009; http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdbdetail_abstract.html?disname=Opsoclonus-Myoclonus%20Syndrome. Accessed 11/2/2009.
  2. NINDS Opsoclonus Myoclonus Information Page. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). 2007; http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/opsoclonus_myoclonus/opsoclonus_myoclonus.htm. Accessed 11/2/2009.
  3. Pranzatelli MR. What is the Opsoclonus-Myoclonus Syndrome?. Opsoclonus-Myoclonus U.S.A. And International web site. http://www.omsusa.org/pranzatelli-Brochure1.htm. Accessed 11/2/2009.
  4. Marc Tardieu. Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome. Orphanet. March, 2006; http://www.orpha.net/consor/cgi-bin/OC_Exp.php?Lng=EN&Expert=1183. Accessed 4/16/2014.
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Basic Information

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  • The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) collects and disseminates research information related to neurological disorders. Click on the link to view information on this topic.
  • The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) is a federation of more than 130 nonprofit voluntary health organizations serving people with rare disorders. Click on the link to view information on this topic.

In Depth Information

  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. Each entry has a summary of related medical articles. It is meant for health care professionals and researchers. OMIM is maintained by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. 
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs.  Access to this database is free of charge.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Dancing eyes-dancing feet syndrome. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Infantile polymyoclonus
  • Kinsbourne syndrome
  • OMS
  • Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome
  • Polymyoclonus infantile
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.