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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Dancing eyes-dancing feet syndrome


Other Names for this Disease

  • Infantile polymyoclonus
  • Kinsbourne syndrome
  • OMS
  • Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome
  • Polymyoclonus infantile
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Tests & Diagnosis

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How is dancing eyes-dancing feet syndrome diagnosed?

A diagnosis of dancing eyes-dancing feet syndrome is mostly based on the presence of the characteristic signs and symptoms of the condition (i.e. it is mainly a clinical diagnosis). In some cases, laboratory tests for certain antibodies and/or for abnormal white blood cells may also be performed.[1]

The most efficient methods for detecting a neuroblastoma (which is present in many affected people) are MRI with contrast, and/or helical (or spiral) CT scanning.[2]
Last updated: 4/16/2014

References
  1. Pranzatelli MR. What is the Opsoclonus-Myoclonus Syndrome?. Opsoclonus-Myoclonus U.S.A. And International web site. http://www.omsusa.org/pranzatelli-Brochure1.htm. Accessed 11/2/2009.
  2. Marc Tardieu. Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome. Orphanet. March, 2006; http://www.orpha.net/consor/cgi-bin/OC_Exp.php?Lng=EN&Expert=1183. Accessed 4/16/2014.
  3. OPSOCLONUS-MYOCLONUS SYNDROME. NORD. July 30, 2012; http://www.rarediseases.org/rare-disease-information/rare-diseases/byID/679/viewAbstract. Accessed 4/16/2014.


Other Names for this Disease
  • Infantile polymyoclonus
  • Kinsbourne syndrome
  • OMS
  • Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome
  • Polymyoclonus infantile
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.