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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Dancing eyes-dancing feet syndrome


Other Names for this Disease

  • Infantile polymyoclonus
  • Kinsbourne syndrome
  • OMS
  • Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome
  • Polymyoclonus infantile
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Prognosis

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What is the prognosis for individuals with dancing eyes-dancing feet syndrome?

Although individuals may fully recover from the underlying cause of the condition, many individuals retain some level of neurological impairment. Full recovery is more common in cases caused by infections than those due to neuroblastoma. Children with the mildest symptoms have the greatest chance of returning to normal after treatment. For those with moderate severity, myoclonus tends to lessen over time, but coordination may never fully return. Learning and behavioral issues may also remain. Those with severe symptoms have the highest risk for permanent neurological problems.[1] 

Relapses of the neurological symptoms may occur with subsequent illness, fever, stress, medication, anesthesia, discontinuation of immunotherapy or after immunizations. Such relapses are common and may occur more than once. In some cases, many years may elapse between episodes. Relapses should be treated, preferably with the same type of treatment used initially.[1] 
Last updated: 11/2/2009

References
  1. Pranzatelli MR. What is the Opsoclonus-Myoclonus Syndrome?. Opsoclonus-Myoclonus U.S.A. And International web site. http://www.omsusa.org/pranzatelli-Brochure1.htm. Accessed 11/2/2009.


Other Names for this Disease
  • Infantile polymyoclonus
  • Kinsbourne syndrome
  • OMS
  • Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome
  • Polymyoclonus infantile
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.