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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Crohn's disease

*

* Not a rare disease

Other Names for this Disease

  • Enteritis
  • Granulomatous colitis
  • Granulomatous enteritis
  • Ileitis
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Symptoms

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What are the signs and symptoms of Crohn's disease?

Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive or gastrointestinal (GI) tract. It usually occurs in the lower part of the small intestine, called the ileum, but it can affect any part of the digestive tract, from the mouth to the anus. The inflammation extends deep into the lining of the affected organ, which can cause abdominal pain and diarrhea.[1] Affected individuals may also have loss of appetite, weight loss, and fever.[2]

About one-third of individuals with Crohn's disease have symptoms outside of the intestines, which may include arthritis, uveitis (inflammation of the covering of the eye), skin lesions, and sacroilitis (inflammation of the large joints of the tail bone and pelvis).[3]

Symptoms of Crohn's disease may range from mild to severe. Most people will go through periods in which the disease flares up and causes symptoms, alternating with periods when symptoms disappear or decrease. People with Crohn’s disease who smoke tend to have more severe symptoms and more complications. In general, people with Crohn's disease lead active and productive lives.[1][3]
Last updated: 11/15/2012

The Human Phenotype Ontology provides the following list of signs and symptoms for Crohn's disease. If the information is available, the table below includes how often the symptom is seen in people with this condition. You can use the MedlinePlus Medical Dictionary to look up the definitions for these medical terms.

Signs and Symptoms Approximate number of patients (when available)
Abdominal pain 90%
Inflammation of the large intestine 90%
Malabsorption 90%
Weight loss 90%
Abnormality of temperature regulation 50%
Anemia 50%
Aplasia/Hypoplasia of the colon 50%
Arrhythmia 50%
Elevated hepatic transaminases 50%
Gastrointestinal hemorrhage 50%
Intestinal fistula 50%
Intestinal obstruction 50%
Peritonitis 50%
Urogenital fistula 50%
Abnormality of the cerebral vasculature 7.5%
Abnormality of the myocardium 7.5%
Abnormality of the oral cavity 7.5%
Abnormality of the pericardium 7.5%
Abnormality of the retinal vasculature 7.5%
Abnormality of the sacroiliac joint 7.5%
Abnormality of thrombocytes 7.5%
Alopecia 7.5%
Arterial stenosis 7.5%
Arthralgia 7.5%
Arthritis 7.5%
Behavioral abnormality 7.5%
Biliary tract abnormality 7.5%
Glomerulopathy 7.5%
Hypercoagulability 7.5%
Inflammatory abnormality of the eye 7.5%
Nausea and vomiting 7.5%
Neoplasm of the colon 7.5%
Nephrolithiasis 7.5%
Pancreatitis 7.5%
Pulmonary embolism 7.5%
Pulmonary infiltrates 7.5%
Recurrent urinary tract infections 7.5%
Reduced bone mineral density 7.5%
Skin rash 7.5%
Skin ulcer 7.5%
Thrombophlebitis 7.5%
Vasculitis 7.5%
Abdominal pain -
Diarrhea -
Heterogeneous -
Intestinal obstruction -
Multifactorial inheritance -
Recurrent aphthous stomatitis -
Weight loss -

Last updated: 11/3/2014

The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) has collected information on how often a sign or symptom occurs in a condition. Much of this information comes from Orphanet, a European rare disease database. The frequency of a sign or symptom is usually listed as a rough estimate of the percentage of patients who have that feature.

The frequency may also be listed as a fraction. The first number of the fraction is how many people had the symptom, and the second number is the total number of people who were examined in one study. For example, a frequency of 25/25 means that in a study of 25 people all patients were found to have that symptom. Because these frequencies are based on a specific study, the fractions may be different if another group of patients are examined.

Sometimes, no information on frequency is available. In these cases, the sign or symptom may be rare or common.


References
  1. Crohn's disease. National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NIDDC). 2006; http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/crohns/index.htm. Accessed 7/29/2010.
  2. Crohn disease. Genetics Home Reference. August 2007; http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/crohn-disease. Accessed 10/15/2012.
  3. Cummings S, Rubin D. The Complexity and Challenges of Genetic Counseling and Testing for Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Journal of Genetic Counseling. December 2006;


Other Names for this Disease
  • Enteritis
  • Granulomatous colitis
  • Granulomatous enteritis
  • Ileitis
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.