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Sickle beta thalassemia


Other Names for this Disease
  • Hb S beta-thalassemia
  • HbS - beta-thalassemia
  • Hemoglobin sickle-beta thalassemia
  • Sickle cell - beta-thalassemia disease
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Overview

Sickle beta thalassemia is an inherited condition that affects hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen to different parts of the body. It is a type of sickle cell disease. Affected people have a different change (mutation) in each copy of their HBB gene: one that causes red blood cells to form a "sickle" or crescent shape and a second that is associated with beta thalassemia, a blood disorder that reduces the production of hemoglobin. Depending on the beta thalassemia mutation, people may have no normal hemoglobin (called sickle beta zero thalassemia) or a reduced amount of normal hemoglobin (called sickle beta plus thalassemia). The presence of sickle-shaped red blood cells, which often breakdown prematurely and can get stuck in blood vessels, combined with the reduction or absence mature red blood cells leads to the many signs and symptoms of sickle beta thalassemia. Features, which may include anemia (low levels of red blood cells), repeated infections, and frequent episodes of pain, generally develop in early childhood and vary in severity depending on the amount of normal hemoglobin made. Sickle beta thalassemia is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Treatment is supportive and depends on the signs and symptoms present in each person.[1][2][3]
Last updated: 12/21/2014

References

  1. MA Bender, MD, PhD and Gabrielle Douthitt Seibel, MN, MPH, ARNP. Sickle Cell Disease. GeneReviews. October 2014; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1377/.
  2. Sickle Cell Disease. Genetics Home Reference. August 2012; http://www.ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/sickle-cell-disease.
  3. Sickle Cell Disease. NORD. April 2008; https://www.rarediseases.org/rare-disease-information/rare-diseases/byID/25/viewAbstract.
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Basic Information

  • You can obtain information on this topic from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC is recognized as the lead federal agency for developing and applying disease prevention and control, environmental health, and health promotion and education activities designed to improve the health of the people of the United States.
  • Genetics Home Reference (GHR) contains information on Sickle beta thalassemia. This website is maintained by the National Library of Medicine.
  • The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) is a federation of more than 130 nonprofit voluntary health organizations serving people with rare disorders. Click on the link to view information on this topic.

In Depth Information

  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for¬†information on rare diseases and orphan drugs.¬† Access to this database is free of charge.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Sickle beta thalassemia. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Hb S beta-thalassemia
  • HbS - beta-thalassemia
  • Hemoglobin sickle-beta thalassemia
  • Sickle cell - beta-thalassemia disease
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.