Your browser does not support javascript:   Search for gard hereSearch for news-and-events here.

Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Print friendly version

GM1 gangliosidosis


Other Names for this Disease

  • Beta galactosidase 1 deficiency
  • Beta-galactosidosis
  • GLB 1 deficiency
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Prognosis

Newline Maker

What is the long-term outlook for people with GM1 gangliosidosis?

The long-term outlook (prognosis) for people with GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1) depends on the type, age of onset, and severity of the condition in each person.

Type 1, also known as the infantile form, is the most severe type of GM1. Children with type 1 usually do not survive past early childhood due to infection and cardiopulmonary failure. Type 2, which includes the late-infantile and juvenile forms, is an intermediate form of the condition. People with type 2 who have late-infantile onset usually survive into mid-childhood, while those with juvenile onset may live into early adulthood. Type 3, known as the adult or chronic form of GM1, is the mildest form of the condition. The age of onset and life expectancy for people with type 3 varies, but life expectancy is usually shortened.[1][2]
Last updated: 6/11/2014

References
  1. GM1 gangliosidosis. Genetics Home Reference. August, 2013; http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/gm1-gangliosidosis. Accessed 6/11/2014.
  2. David H Tegay. GM1 gangliosidosis. Medscape Reference. March 29, 2012; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/951637-overview. Accessed 6/11/2014.


Other Names for this Disease
  • Beta galactosidase 1 deficiency
  • Beta-galactosidosis
  • GLB 1 deficiency
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.