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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Celiac disease

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* Not a rare disease
Other Names for this Disease
  • Celiac sprue
  • Coeliac disease
  • Gluten intolerance
  • Gluten-induced enteropathy
  • Gluten-sensitive enteropathy
More Names
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Overview


Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that damages the small intestine and inhibits absorption of nutrients. People with celiac disease cannot tolerate gluten, a protein in wheat, rye, barley, and in some products such as medicines, vitamins, and lip balms. When affected people eat food with gluten, or use a product with gluten, the immune system reacts by damaging tiny parts of the lining of the small intestine called villi. Because villi normally allow the blood to absorb nutrients from food, affected individuals become malnourished.[1] Classic signs and symptoms are caused by inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and may include diarrhea, weight loss, abdominal pain, swelling, and food intolerance. However, many people have other symptoms involving many body systems, and some people have no symptoms.[2][3] While celiac disease tends to run in families, it does not follow a specific inheritance pattern. The risk to develop celiac disease is raised by having certain forms of the HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 genes.[2] Treatment is a lifelong, gluten-free diet.[3]
Last updated: 2/6/2014

References

  1. Celiac disease. NDDIC. January 27, 2012; http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/celiac/. Accessed 2/3/2014.
  2. Celiac disease. Genetics Home Reference. October, 2011; http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/celiac-disease. Accessed 2/3/2014.
  3. Celiac Disease. MedlinePlus. May 6, 2013; http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/celiacdisease.html. Accessed 2/4/2014.
Your Questions Answered
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1 question(s) from the public on Celiac disease have been answered. See questions and answers. You can also submit a new question.

Basic Information

  • Genetics Home Reference (GHR) contains information on Celiac disease. This website is maintained by the National Library of Medicine.
  • MedlinePlus was designed by the National Library of Medicine to help you research your health questions, and it provides more information about this topic.
  • The Merck Manuals Online Medical Library provides information on this condition. Click on the link to view the information.
  • The National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC), part of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), offers information on this condition. Click on the link to view information on this topic.
  • The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) is a federation of more than 130 nonprofit voluntary health organizations serving people with rare disorders. Click on the link to view information on this topic.

In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. Click on the link to view this information. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs.  Access to this database is free of charge.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Celiac disease. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.