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Apocrine carcinoma


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Overview

Apocrine carcinoma is a cancer of a sweat gland.  Apocrine carcionoma most often develops under the arm (the axilla), but it can develop on the scalp or other parts of the body.[1][2]  The cause of apocrine carcinoma is unknown.  Apocrine carcinoma usually appears as a single, small, painless bump (nodule) that can vary in color and slowly increases in size.[1][2]  The average age at the time of diagnosis is 62 years of age, and twice as many men are affected than women.[2]  Most apocrine carcinomas can be treated and are not fatal.[2][3]  Treatment of apocrine carcinoma is surgery to remove as much of the cancer as possible.[1][2][3]  Additional treatments such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy have been used to treat this condition, but the usefulness of these treatments is unproven.[3]
Last updated: 6/16/2014

References

  1. Miyamoto T, Hagari Y, Inoue S, Watanabe T, Yoshino T. Axillary apocrine carcinoma with benign apocrine tumours: a case report involving a pathological and immunohistochemical study and review of the literature. Journal of Clinical Pathology. 2005; 58(7):757-761. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15976347. Accessed 6/16/2014.
  2. Katagiri Y, Ansai S.. Two cases of cutaneous apocrine ductal carcinoma of the axilla. Case report and review of the literature. Dermatology. 1999; 199(4):332-337. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10640844. Accessed 6/16/2014.
  3. Vucinic I, Stojadinovic T, Mikez ZB, Danic D, Coha B.. Apocrine carcinoma of the scalp with aggressive clinical course--a case report and review of the literature. Collegium Antropologicum. 2012; 36:209-212. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23397789. Accessed 6/16/2014.
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