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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Cutis verticis gyrata


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Cause

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What causes cutis verticis gyrate?

Cutis verticis gyrate (CVG) is known to occur along with neuropsychiatric disorders, such as cerebral palsy, epilepsy, intellectual disability, schizophrenia, microcephaly (small head size), and seizures.[1][2] It may also develop in association with eye abnormalities, such as cataracts, strabismus, nystagmus, retinitis pigmentosa, blindness, and keratoconus.[1][2] The reason for CVG in these cases is not known.

Other cases of CVG occur in people with no other medical condition. Likewise, the cause of CVG in these individuals is not known.[1][3][2]

In some cases, CVG is caused by a condition that changes the structure of the scalp, such as an infection or inflammatory condition.[1][2] Examples include eczema, psoriasis, Darier disease, folliculitis, impetigo, atopic dermatitis, and acne. CVG may also be caused by birthmarks, moles, or too much growth hormone.[2]

 

Last updated: 5/15/2014

References
  1. Skibinska MD, Janniger CK. Cutis Verticis Gyrata. eMedicine. 2008; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1113735-overview. Accessed 7/31/2009.
  2. Chang GY. Cutis verticis gyrata, underrecognized neurocutaneous syndrome. Neurology. August 1996; 47(2):573-5. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8757042. Accessed 5/15/2014.
  3. Larson F. Cutis verticis gyrata. DermNet NZ. 2009; http://dermnetnz.org/dermal-infiltrative/cutis-verticis-gyrata.html. Accessed 7/31/2009.


See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.