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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Schizencephaly


Other Names for this Disease

  • Familial schizencephaly
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Treatment

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How might schizencephaly be treated?

The best treatment options for people with schizencephaly depend on many factors, including the severity of the condition and the signs and symptoms present. For example, people with developmental delay (i.e. delayed motor milestones) or partial paralysis may be referred for physical therapy and/or occupational therapy. Medications are often prescribed to prevent seizures. In cases that are complicated by hydrocephalus, a surgically implanted tube, called a shunt, is often used to divert fluid to another area of the body where it can be absorbed.[1][2]
Last updated: 11/18/2014

References
  1. NINDS Schizencephaly Information Page. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. April 16, 2014; http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/schizencephaly/schizencephaly.htm. Accessed 11/17/2014.
  2. Schizencephaly. Orphanet. May 2014; http://www.orpha.net/consor/cgi-bin/OC_Exp.php?Lng=GB&Expert=799. Accessed 11/17/2014.


Clinical Trials & Research for this Disease

  • ClinicalTrials.gov lists trials that are studying or have studied Schizencephaly. Click on the link to go to ClinicalTrials.gov to read descriptions of these studies.
  • The¬†Cortical Foundation provides information on participating in research for cortical malformations of the brain.
  • Orphanet lists clinical trials, research studies, and patient registries enrolling people with this condition. Click on Orphanet to view the list.
  • The Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tool (RePORT) provides access to reports, data, and analyses of research activities at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), including information on NIH expenditures and the results of NIH-supported research. Although these projects may not conduct studies on humans, you may want to contact the investigators to learn more. To search for studies, enter the disease name in the "Text Search" box. Then click "Submit Query".
  • The Christopher A. Walsh Laboratory is interested in the development of the cerebral cortex.¬†Abnormal development of the cerebral cortex in humans results in epilepsy, autism, mental retardation, dyslexia, and other learning disorders, and perhaps some psychiatric conditions as well. Several of their projects are directed at trying to understand the basic biology of the cortex by studying the mutations that disturb its development. Conditions that they are currently researching include: double cortex syndrome, periventricular heterotopia, schizencephaly, perisylvian polymicrogyria and Walker Warburg syndrome. Click on the link above to access further information about this research.

Other Names for this Disease
  • Familial schizencephaly
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.