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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Rotor syndrome


Other Names for this Disease
  • Hyperbilirubinemia, Rotor type
  • Rotor-type hyperbilirubinemia
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Treatment

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How might Rotor syndrome be treated?

Rotor syndrome is considered a benign disorder and does not require treatment.[1]

While no adverse drug reactions have been reported in people with Rotor syndrome, a number of commonly used drugs and/or their metabolites may have serious consequences in affected people. This is because some drugs enter the liver via one of the two transporter proteins that are absent in affected people.[1] People with Rotor syndrome should make sure all of their health care providers are aware of their diagnosis and should check with their health care providers regarding drugs that should be avoided.
Last updated: 4/9/2015

References
  1. Milan Jirsa, AS Knisely, Alfred Schinkel, and Stanislav Kmoch. Rotor Syndrome. GeneReviews. December 13, 2012; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK114805/.


Management Guidelines

  • GeneReviews provides current, expert-authored, peer-reviewed, full-text articles describing the application of genetic testing to the diagnosis, management, and genetic counseling of patients with specific inherited conditions. Click on the link to view the article on this topic.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Hyperbilirubinemia, Rotor type
  • Rotor-type hyperbilirubinemia
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.