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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Medullary sponge kidney


Other Names for this Disease
  • Cacchi Ricci disease
  • Cacchi-Ricci syndrome
  • Cystic dilatation of renal collecting tubes
  • Precalyceal canalicular ectasia
  • Sponge kidney
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Overview


Medullary sponge kidney (MSK) is a birth defect of the tubules-tiny tubes inside the kidneys. In a normal kidney, urine flows through these tubules as it is being formed. In MSK, tiny sacs called cysts form in the medulla-the inner part of the kidney-creating a sponge-like appearance. The cysts keep urine from flowing freely through the tubules. MSK is present at birth but symptoms typically do not occur until adulthood. Problems caused by MSK, include blood in the urine, kidney stones, and urinary tract infections. MSK rarely leads to more serious problems, such as total kidney failure.[1]
Last updated: 10/10/2012

References

  1. Medullary Sponge Kidney. National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse. September 2012; http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/medullaryspongekidney/. Accessed 10/10/2012.
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  • The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is an catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. Each entry has a summary of related medical articles. It is meant for health care professionals and researchers. OMIM is maintained by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. 
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