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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Jacobsen syndrome


Other Names for this Disease

  • Chromosome 11q deletion syndrome
  • JBS
  • Partial 11q monosomy syndrome
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Cause

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What causes Jacobsen syndrome?

Jacobsen syndrome is caused by a deletion of genetic material at the end of the long (q) arm of chromosome 11. The size of the deletion varies among affected individuals, with most affected people missing from about 5 million to 16 million DNA building blocks (also written as 5 Mb to 16 Mb). In almost all affected people, the deletion includes the tip of chromosome 11. Larger deletions tend to cause more severe signs and symptoms than smaller deletions.[1]

The features of Jacobsen syndrome are likely related to the loss of multiple genes on chromosome 11. Depending on its size, the deleted region can contain from about 170 to more than 340 genes. Many of these genes have not been well characterized. However, genes in this region appear to be critical for the normal development of many parts of the body, including the brain, facial features, and heart. Researchers are working to determine which genes contribute to the specific features of Jacobsen syndrome.[1]

Last updated: 9/20/2010

References
  1. Jacobsen syndrome. Genetics Home Reference (GHR). 2009; http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/jacobsen-syndrome. Accessed 9/20/2010.


Other Names for this Disease
  • Chromosome 11q deletion syndrome
  • JBS
  • Partial 11q monosomy syndrome
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.