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Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Konigsmark Knox Hussels syndrome


Other Names for this Disease
  • Deafness optic atrophy syndrome
  • Dominant congenital deafness and progressive optic nerve atrophy
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Overview



What is Konigsmark Knox Hussels syndrome?

What causes Konigsmark Knox Hussels syndrome?

Is genetic testing available for Konigsmark Knox Hussels syndrome?


What is Konigsmark Knox Hussels syndrome?

Konigsmark Knox Hussels syndrome is an inherited condition that causes both hearing and vision loss. This condition is characterized by late-onset progressive sensorineural deafness and progressive optic atrophy, which results in mildly reduced visual acuity. Some affected individuals can develop ophthalmoplegia (paralysis of the muscles that control eye movements), ptosis, ataxia, and non-specific myopathy in middle age. This condition is caused by a particular mutation in the OPA1 gene and is inerited in an autosomal dominant fashion.[1]
Last updated: 5/13/2011

What causes Konigsmark Knox Hussels syndrome?

Konigsmark Knox Hussels syndrome is caused by a particular mutation in the OPA1 gene. In most cases, this condition is caused by a mutation that replaces the amino acid arginine with the amino acid histidine at position 445 in the OPA1 protein. This is written as Arg445His or R445H. It is unclear why the R445H mutation causes both hearing and vision loss in affected individuals.[2]
Last updated: 5/13/2011

Is genetic testing available for Konigsmark Knox Hussels syndrome?

GeneTests lists the names of laboratories that are performing genetic testing for Konigsmark Knox Hussels syndrome. To view the contact information for the clinical laboratories conducting testing click here.

Please note:  Most of the laboratories listed through GeneTests do not accept direct contact from patients and their families; therefore, if you are interested in learning more, you will need to work with a health care provider or a genetics professional.  Below, we provide a list of online resources that can assist you in locating a genetics professional near you.
Last updated: 5/13/2011

References
  1. Optic atrophy 1 and deafness. Online Mendelian Inheritance of Man (OMIM). 2010; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim/125250. Accessed 5/13/2011.
  2. OPA1. Genetics Home Reference. June 2009; http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/gene/OPA1. Accessed 5/13/2011.