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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Lipoid proteinosis of Urbach and Wiethe


Other Names for this Disease

  • Hyalinosis cutis et mucosae
  • Lipoproteinosis
  • Urbach Wiethe disease
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Treatment

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How might lipoid proteinosis of Urbach and Wiethe be treated?

There is currently no cure for lipoid proteinosis (LP) of Urbach and Wiethe. Treatment is based on the signs and symptoms present in each person. The skin abnormalities found in people affected by LP may be treated with certain medications, including corticosteriods, dimethyl sulfoxide; or d-penicillamine. An additional medication called acitretin can be used to treat hoarseness and some skin problems. Anticonvulsant medications are often prescribed for people with seizures. The success of these medications in treating the signs and symptoms of LP varies.[1][2][3]

Affected people with growths on their vocal cords or eyelids may be treated with carbon dioxide laser surgery. Dermabrasion (removal of the top layer of skin) may also improve the appearance of skin abnormalities.[1][2]

Last updated: 11/25/2014

References
  1. Ivan D Camacho, MD. Lipoid Proteinosis. Medscape. January 10, 2014; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1103357-overview.
  2. http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/lipoid_proteinosis/lipoid_proteinosis.htm. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. January 2009; http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/lipoid_proteinosis/lipoid_proteinosis.htm.
  3. Lipoid proteinosis. Orphanet. October 2014; http://www.orpha.net/consor/cgi-bin/OC_Exp.php?lng=en&Expert=530.


Other Names for this Disease
  • Hyalinosis cutis et mucosae
  • Lipoproteinosis
  • Urbach Wiethe disease
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.