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Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Cheilitis glandularis


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Overview

Cheilitis glandularis is a rare inflammatory disorder of the lip[1]. It is mainly characterized by swelling of the lip with hyperplasia of the salivary glands; secretion of a clear, thick mucus; and variable inflammation.[2] Enlargement and chronic exposure of the mucous membrane on the lower lip becomes affected by the environment, leading to erosion, ulceration, crusting, and, occasionally, infection.[1] It occurs typically in the lower lip of adult males, but has been described in the upper lip, or in teenagers. In Caucasians, it is associated with a relatively high incidence of squamous cell carcinoma of the lip. Although there may be a genetic susceptibility, no definitive cause has been established. Treatment may include surgical excision by vermilionectomy (sometimes called a lip shave), but treatment varies for each individual.[2][1]
Last updated: 4/13/2011

References

  1. Ellen Eisenberg. Cheilitis Glandularis. Medscape. April 14, 2010; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1078725-overview. Accessed 4/13/2011.
  2. E. Robert-Gnansia. Cheilitis glandularis. Orphanet. January 2004; http://www.orpha.net/consor/cgi-bin/OC_Exp.php?lng=EN&Expert=1221. Accessed 4/13/2011.
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In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. Click on the link to view this information. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. Each entry has a summary of related medical articles. It is meant for health care professionals and researchers. OMIM is maintained by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. 
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs.  Access to this database is free of charge.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Cheilitis glandularis. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.

Resources for Kids

  • Kids Skin Health, a American Academy of Dermatology's web site, provides kids, teens, and parents with information on skin conditions. Click on Kids Skin Health to access this Web site.
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.