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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Parsonage Turner syndrome


Other Names for this Disease

  • Acute brachial neuritis
  • Acute brachial neuritis syndrome
  • Acute brachial radiculitis syndrome
  • Acute shoulder neuritis
  • Idiopathic neuralgic amyotrophy
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Your Question

I have been recovering from Parsonage Turner syndrome for years. I still have some pain, the fatigue is still with me and my quality of life is compromised. Can this develop into something else? Also, is it normal that I still have fatigue after 5 plus years?

Our Answer

We have identified the following information that we hope you find helpful. If you still have questions, please contact us.

What is the long-term outlook for people with Parsonage Turner syndrome?

The long-term outlook (prognosis) for people with Parsonage Turner syndrome (PTS) varies. Some people may only experience a single episode of pain and fully recover the strength and functionality of their shoulder, while others have multiple episodes of PTS throughout their life. It has been reported that approximately 80% of affected people recover within 2 years of the condition onset and approximately 90% recover within 3 years. Traditionally, it was believed that most affected people would recover around 70-90% of their original strength and function level, but more recent research suggests that long-term complications are more common than previously reported. People with bilateral (affecting both sides of the body) involvement or multiple episodes of PTS are more likely to have a poor prognosis.[1][2]
Last updated: 1/22/2015

References
Other Names for this Disease
  • Acute brachial neuritis
  • Acute brachial neuritis syndrome
  • Acute brachial radiculitis syndrome
  • Acute shoulder neuritis
  • Idiopathic neuralgic amyotrophy
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.