Your browser does not support javascript:   Search for gard hereSearch for news-and-events here.

Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Print friendly version

Complex regional pain syndrome


Other Names for this Disease

  • CRPS
  • Reflex sympathetic dystrophy
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Symptoms

Newline Maker

What are the signs and symptoms of complex regional pain syndrome?

Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) usually develops after an injury, surgery, stroke or heart attack.[1] The key symptom of CRPS is continuous, intense pain that is out of proportion to the severity of the injury. The pain gets worse over time. CRPS most often affects one of the arms, legs, hands, or feet, and the pain often spreads throughout the entire affected arm or leg.[2] Other signs and symptoms may include:[1]
  • sensitivity to touch or cold
  • swelling of the painful area
  • changes in skin temperature, color, and/or texture
  • joint stiffness and swelling
  • muscle weakness and/or muscle spasms

Symptoms may change over time and vary from person to person. In some people, signs and symptoms of go away on their own. In others, symptoms can persist for months to years.[1]

Last updated: 11/11/2014

References
  1. Complex regional pain syndrome. Mayo Clinic. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/complex-regional-pain-syndrome/basics/definition/con-20022844. Accessed 11/11/2014.
  2. NINDS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Information Page. NINDS. September 26, 2014; http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/reflex_sympathetic_dystrophy/reflex_sympathetic_dystrophy.htm. Accessed 11/10/2014.


Other Names for this Disease
  • CRPS
  • Reflex sympathetic dystrophy
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.