Your browser does not support javascript:   Search for gard hereSearch for news-and-events here.

Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Print friendly version

Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura


Other Names for this Disease

  • Autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura
  • ITP
  • Thrombocytopenic purpura autoimmune
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Your Question

I was first diagnosed with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, which then progressed to Evans syndrome. I had a splenectomy and have since been in remission. My husband and I have been together for 10 years, and in this time I have not conceived. Can Evans syndrome cause infertility? If I do get pregnant, would there be a chance my child could have the same condition?

Our Answer

We have identified the following information that we hope you find helpful. If you still have questions, please contact us.

Can Evans syndrome cause infertility?

A review of available literature does not yield any information or case reports regarding Evans syndrome and infertility. Furthermore, infertility is not mentioned as being a sign or symptom of Evans syndrome in various resources.

Evans syndrome appears to be rare in pregnancy with only a few published cases. Because some of the medications used to treat Evan's syndrome may be harmful to a developing baby, treatment options in pregnancy can be limited. However, women with Evans syndrome can have successful pregnancies.[1]
Last updated: 11/16/2014

Can idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura be inherited?

The cause of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is unknown. It is not thought to be genetic because it is rare for multiple people in the same family to develop this disease.[2] Only a few cases of familial ITP have been documented, including an affected woman and 3 of her 4 children, identical twins with chronic ITP, and a mother with chronic ITP who had a child with purpura. The child's purpura resolved on its own within 3 weeks while the mother remained thrombocytopenic.[3]
Last updated: 1/22/2013

Is Evans syndrome inherited?

No inherited cause for Evans syndrome has been identified. This condition rarely affects more than one person in the same family.[4][5][6]
Last updated: 11/16/2014

References
  • Lefkou E, Nelson-Piercy C, Hunt BJ. Evans' syndrome in pregnancy: a systematic literature review and two new cases. European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology. March 2010; 149(1):10-17. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20031296. Accessed 4/24/2011.
  • B. Godeau . Immune thrombocytopenic purpura. Orphanet. August 2009; http://www.orpha.net/consor/cgi-bin/OC_Exp.php?lng=EN&Expert=3002. Accessed 3/22/2012.
  • Paul J. Converse et al. THROMBOCYTOPENIC PURPURA, AUTOIMMUNE; AITP. OMIM. March 20, 2009; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim/188030. Accessed 3/22/2012.
  • Ahmed FE, Albakrah MS. Neonatal familial Evans syndrome associated with joint hypermobility and mitral valve regurgitation in three siblings in a Saudi Arab family.. Ann Saudi Med. May 2009; 29(3):227-230. Accessed 11/16/2014.
  • Ahmed FE, Qureshi IM, Wooldridge MA, Pejaver RK.. Hereditary spastic paraplegia and Evans's syndrome. Acta Paediatr. July 1996; 85(7):879-881. Accessed 11/16/2014.
  • McLeod AG, Pai M, Carter RF, Squire J, Barr RD.. Familial Evans syndrome: a report of an affected sibship.. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol.. May-June 1999; 21(3):244-247. Accessed 11/16/2014.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura
  • ITP
  • Thrombocytopenic purpura autoimmune
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.