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Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

*

* Not a rare disease

Other Names for this Disease

  • Idiopathic adolescent scoliosis
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Overview

Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is an abnormal curvature of the spine that appears in late childhood or adolescence. Instead of growing straight, the spine develops a side-to-side curvature, usually in an elongated "s" or "C" shape, and the bones of the spine become slightly twisted or rotated. In many cases, the abnormal spinal curve is stable; however, in some children, the curve becomes more severe over time (progressive). For unknown reasons, severe and progressive curves occur more frequently in girls than in boys. The cause of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is unknown. It is likely that there are both genetic and environmental factors involved.[1] Treatment may include observation, bracing and/or surgery.[2]
Last updated: 11/10/2014

References

  1. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Genetics Home Reference (GHR). September 2013; http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/adolescent-idiopathic-scoliosis. Accessed 11/10/2014.
  2. Idiopathic Scoliosis: Adolescents: Treatment. Scoliosis Research Society. 2014; http://www.srs.org/patient_and_family/scoliosis/idiopathic/adolescents/treatment.htm. Accessed 11/10/2014.
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Basic Information

  • Genetics Home Reference contains information on Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. This website is maintained by the National Library of Medicine.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Idiopathic adolescent scoliosis
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.