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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Prader-Willi syndrome


Other Names for this Disease
  • Prader-Labhart-Willi syndrome
  • PWS
  • Willi-Prader syndrome
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Your Question

For individuals with Prader Willi syndrome, how does this condition affect their lives when they get older?

Our Answer

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What is the long-term outlook for people with Prader-Willi syndrome?

Children with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) can be mainstreamed into the classroom environment, although they need additional speech therapy and should have additional physical activity periods in place of rest periods. They generally need a structured environment and may need a smaller classroom size for individual attention.[1]

People with PWS usually reach adulthood and are able to function in a group home setting, performing vocational work, or attending community college classes.[1] According to the Prader-Willi Syndrome Association, people with PWS can expect to accomplish many of the things their peers do. However, they do need a significant amount of support from their families and from school, work, and residential service providers. Even those with IQs in the normal range need lifelong diet supervision and protection from food availability.[2]

Complications that could affect the quality of life and potentially shorten life expectancy include those relating to hypogonadism, behavioral or psychological issues, and morbid obesity.[1]
Last updated: 1/6/2015

References
Other Names for this Disease
  • Prader-Labhart-Willi syndrome
  • PWS
  • Willi-Prader syndrome
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.