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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Androgen insensitivity syndrome


Other Names for this Disease

  • AIS
  • Androgen receptor deficiency
  • DHTR deficiency
  • Dihydrotestosterone receptor deficiency
  • Testicular feminization syndrome (formerly)
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Your Question

How does androgen insensitivity syndrome affect gender identity?

Our Answer

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How does androgen insensitivty syndrome affect gender identity?

Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome occurs when the body cannot use androgens at all. People with this form of the condition have the external sex characteristics of females, but do not have a uterus and therefore do not menstruate and are unable to conceive a child (infertile). They are typically raised as females and have a female gender identity.[1]

The partial and mild forms of androgen insensitivity syndrome result when the body's tissues are partially sensitive to the effects of androgens. People with partial androgen insensitivity (also called Reifenstein syndrome) can have normal female sex characteristics, both male and female sex characteristics, or normal male sex characteristics. They may be raised as males or as females, and may have a male or a female gender identity.[1]
Last updated: 3/30/2011

References
Other Names for this Disease
  • AIS
  • Androgen receptor deficiency
  • DHTR deficiency
  • Dihydrotestosterone receptor deficiency
  • Testicular feminization syndrome (formerly)
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.