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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Anencephaly


Other Names for this Disease

  • Absence of a large part of the brain and the skull
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Inheritance

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Can anencephaly be inherited?

Ninety percent of open neural tube defects happen to couples without a prior family history of these defects.[1] While most neural tube defects (NTDs) are caused by a complex interaction between various genes and environmental factors, rare cases of NTDs are transmitted in an autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive manner in certain families.[2][3] Such families may have children or fetuses with spina bifida, anencephaly, or other subtypes of NTDs.[3]
Last updated: 10/18/2013

References
  1. Anencephaly. Children's Hospital Boston. 2010; http://www.childrenshospital.org/az/Site578/mainpageS578P0.html. Accessed 11/28/2011.
  2. Anencephaly. Orphanet. 2006; http://www.orpha.net/consor/cgi-bin/OC_Exp.php?lng=EN&Expert=1048. Accessed 11/28/2011.
  3. Best RG, Gregg AR, Lorenzo N. Anencephaly. eMedicine. 2010; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1181570-overview. Accessed 11/28/2011.


Other Names for this Disease
  • Absence of a large part of the brain and the skull
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.