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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Becker muscular dystrophy


Other Names for this Disease

  • Becker's muscular dystrophy
  • Benign pseudohypertrophic muscular dystrophy
  • Muscular dystrophy pseudohypertrophic progressive, Becker type
  • Muscular dystrophy, Becker type
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Inheritance

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How is Becker muscular dystrophy inherited?

Becker muscular dystrophy is inherited in an X-linked recessive manner. A condition is considered X-linked if the mutated gene that causes the condition is located on the X chromosome, one of the two sex chromosomes. In males (who have only one X chromosome), one mutated copy of the gene in each cell is sufficient to cause the condition. In females (who have two X chromosomes), a mutation must be present in both copies of the gene to cause the condition. Males are affected by X-linked recessive disorders much more frequently than females. A specific characteristic of X-linked inheritance is that fathers cannot pass X-linked traits to their sons.[1]

In X-linked recessive inheritance, a female with one mutated copy of the gene in each cell is called a carrier. Female carriers of X-linked recessive conditions have a 50% (1 in 2) risk to pass on the mutated gene to each child. Male children have a 50% risk to be affected, and female children have a 50% risk to be a carrier. Female carriers usually do not have signs or symptoms of the condition. Occasionally, females who carry a DMD mutation may have muscle weakness and cramping. These symptoms are typically milder than the severe muscle weakness and wasting in affected males. Females who carry a DMD mutation also have an increased risk to develop heart problems, including dilated cardiomyopathy.[1]

In about two thirds of cases, an affected male inherits the mutation from his mother who carries a mutated copy of the DMD gene. The other third of cases probably result from new mutations in the gene.[1]

Last updated: 3/5/2014

References
  1. Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy. Genetics Home Reference (GHR). 2007; http://www.ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition=duchenneandbeckermusculardystrophy. Accessed 11/18/2009.


Other Names for this Disease
  • Becker's muscular dystrophy
  • Benign pseudohypertrophic muscular dystrophy
  • Muscular dystrophy pseudohypertrophic progressive, Becker type
  • Muscular dystrophy, Becker type
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.