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Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Brucellosis


Other Names for this Disease

  • Cyprus fever
  • Gibraltar fever
  • Malta fever
  • Rock fever
  • Undulant fever
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Overview

Brucellosis is a bacterial infection that spreads from animals to people via unpasteurized dairy products or by exposure to contaminated animal products or infected animals.[1][2] Animals that are most commonly infected include sheep, cattle, goats, pigs, and dogs. Brucellosis can cause of range of signs and symptoms, some of which may persist or recur. Initial symptoms may include fever, sweats, malaise, anorexia, headache, fatigue, and/or pain in the muscles, joints, and/or back. Symptoms that may persist or recur include fevers, arthritis, swelling of the testicle and scrotum, swelling of the heart (endocarditis), neurologic symptoms (in up to 5% of cases), chronic fatigue, depression, and/or swelling of the liver or spleen. People who are in jobs or settings that increase exposure to the bacteria are at increased risk for infection. Antibiotics are used to treat brucellosis.[1] Recovery may take a few weeks to several months, and relapses are common.[1][2] Death from brucellosis is rare, occurring in no more than 2% of cases.[1]
Last updated: 12/12/2014

References

  1. Brucellosis. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. November 12, 2012; http://www.cdc.gov/brucellosis/. Accessed 12/12/2014.
  2. Brucellosis. Mayo Clinic. January 2, 2014; http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/brucellosis/basics/definition/con-20028263. Accessed 12/12/2014.
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Basic Information

  • You can obtain information on this topic from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC is recognized as the lead federal agency for developing and applying disease prevention and control, environmental health, and health promotion and education activities designed to improve the health of the people of the United States.
  • The MayoClinic.com has an information page on this topic. Click on the link above to view this information page.
  • MedlinePlus was designed by the National Library of Medicine to help you research your health questions, and it provides more information about this topic.
  • The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) is a federation of more than 130 nonprofit voluntary health organizations serving people with rare disorders. Click on the link to view information on this topic.
  • The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has a fact sheet about Brucellosis provided by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). Click on the link to view this fact sheet.

In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. Click on the link to view this information. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs.  Access to this database is free of charge.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Brucellosis. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Cyprus fever
  • Gibraltar fever
  • Malta fever
  • Rock fever
  • Undulant fever
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.