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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Alopecia universalis


Other Names for this Disease

  • Alopecia areata universalis
  • AU
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Your Question

My fiance has alopecia universalis. He has no family history of this condition. Recently, I read that the disease is hereditary. This worries me. Please help me understand our future children's chance of developing alopecia universalis.

Our Answer

We have identified the following information that we hope you find helpful. If you still have questions, please contact us.

If one parent has alopecia universalis, what is the chance that a couple's child will be affected?

Alopecia universalis is believed to be a multifactorial condition, which means it is caused by a combination of environmental influences and genetic predisposition. Although the condition is not inherited directly, a predisposition to alopecia universalis can run in families. If one parent has alopecia areata or alopecia universalis (a more severe form of alopecia areata), the couple's child would have an estimated 6% lifetime risk for alopecia[1][2] and a 2% lifetime risk for alopecia universalis.[1]
Last updated: 11/23/2014

References
Other Names for this Disease
  • Alopecia areata universalis
  • AU
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.