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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Cushing's syndrome


Other Names for this Disease

  • Adrenal cortex adenoma
  • Adrenal hyperfunction resulting from pituitary acth excess
  • Cushing syndrome
  • Ectopic ACTH syndrome
  • Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Symptoms

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What are the signs and symptoms of Cushing's syndrome?

The signs and symptoms of Cushing's syndrome may include:[1]

  • Upper body obesity
  • Severe fatigue
  • Muscle weakness
  • High blood pressure
  • Backache
  • Elevated blood sugar
  • Easy bruising
  • Bluish-red stretch marks on the skin
  • Neurological issues

Women with Cushing's syndrome may also experience increased growth of facial and body hair, and menstrual periods may become irregular or cease.[1][2] Men may have decreased fertility, diminished sexual desire, and/or erectile dysfunction.[2]
Last updated: 11/30/2014

The Human Phenotype Ontology provides the following list of signs and symptoms for Cushing's syndrome. If the information is available, the table below includes how often the symptom is seen in people with this condition. You can use the MedlinePlus Medical Dictionary to look up the definitions for these medical terms.

Signs and Symptoms Approximate number of patients (when available)
Abnormality of adipose tissue 90%
Erectile abnormalities 90%
Hypercortisolism 90%
Round face 90%
Thin skin 90%
Truncal obesity 90%
Abnormality of immune system physiology 50%
Acne 50%
Bruising susceptibility 50%
Decreased fertility 50%
Diabetes mellitus 50%
Hypertension 50%
Hypertrichosis 50%
Hypokalemia 50%
Muscle weakness 50%
Nephrolithiasis 50%
Recurrent fractures 50%
Reduced bone mineral density 50%
Striae distensae 50%
Abdominal pain 7.5%
Abnormal renal physiology 7.5%
Abnormality of lipid metabolism 7.5%
Abnormality of the gastric mucosa 7.5%
Aseptic necrosis 7.5%
Cataract 7.5%
Hypercalcemia 7.5%
Hypernatremia 7.5%
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 7.5%
Myopathy 7.5%
Neoplasm of the adrenal gland 7.5%
Reduced consciousness/confusion 7.5%
Secondary amenorrhea 7.5%
Sleep disturbance 7.5%
Teleangiectasia of the skin 7.5%
Adult onset -
Agitation -
Amyotrophy -
Anxiety -
Autosomal dominant inheritance -
Bruising susceptibility -
Decreased circulating ACTH level -
Depression -
Hypertension -
Increased circulating cortisol level -
Kyphosis -
Macronodular adrenal hyperplasia -
Mental deterioration -
Mood changes -
Neoplasm -
Osteopenia -
Osteoporosis -
Primary hypercorticolism -
Psychosis -
Round face -
Sporadic -
Striae distensae -
Thin skin -
Truncal obesity -

Last updated: 12/1/2014

The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) has collected information on how often a sign or symptom occurs in a condition. Much of this information comes from Orphanet, a European rare disease database. The frequency of a sign or symptom is usually listed as a rough estimate of the percentage of patients who have that feature.

The frequency may also be listed as a fraction. The first number of the fraction is how many people had the symptom, and the second number is the total number of people who were examined in one study. For example, a frequency of 25/25 means that in a study of 25 people all patients were found to have that symptom. Because these frequencies are based on a specific study, the fractions may be different if another group of patients are examined.

Sometimes, no information on frequency is available. In these cases, the sign or symptom may be rare or common.


References
  1. NINDS Cushing's Syndrome Information Page. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. July 2013; http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/cushings/cushings.htm.
  2. Cushing's Syndrome. National Endocrine and Metabolic. April 2012; http://www.endocrine.niddk.nih.gov/pubs/cushings/cushings.aspx. Accessed 2/26/2013.


Other Names for this Disease
  • Adrenal cortex adenoma
  • Adrenal hyperfunction resulting from pituitary acth excess
  • Cushing syndrome
  • Ectopic ACTH syndrome
  • Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.