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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Cyclic vomiting syndrome


Other Names for this Disease

  • CVS
  • Familial cyclic vomiting syndrome (subtype)
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Treatment

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How might cyclic vomiting syndrome be treated?

Treatment of cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS) aims to prevent, stop, and/or support the symptoms of the condition. Most treatments have been based upon observational data or clinical experience. Affected people should try to avoid things that appear to trigger episodes (e.g. motion, fasting, certain foods).

If episodes occur more often than monthly, or if they last long or are debilitating, daily prophylactic (preventative) therapy is recommended. Some experts recommend amitriptyline even if there is no history of headache or a family history of migraines. However, its use may be limited due to side effects in infants and toddlers under age 5. If episodes are less frequent or are mild, therapy to try to stop the episode at the onset is often preferred. If this fails after two or three attempts, switching to prophylactic therapy is usually recommended.

Coenzyme Q10 and L-carnitine have also been recommended for prophylactic therapy because data suggest that these dietary supplements may be highly effective, and side effects are mild. Topiramate is an unproven therapy that is gaining in popularity due to anecdotal reports effectiveness, but side effects occur often and can be significant. Stopping an episode with intravenous dextrose and high-doses of ondansetron have reportedly been helpful in anecdotal reports in children.

During an episode, treatment may also include supportive care such as intravenous fluids. Therapy with other medications may depend on whether there is a family history of migraines, the frequency of episodes, and the severity of episodes. Medications used may include ant-migraine drugs, anti-nausea drugs, sedatives, medications that suppress stomach acid, pain relievers, and/or antidepressants.[1]
Last updated: 11/13/2014

References
  1. David J Desilets and Richard G Boles. Cyclic vomiting syndrome. UpToDate. Waltham, MA: UpToDate; October, 2014; Accessed 11/13/2014.


Clinical Trials & Research for this Disease

  • ClinicalTrials.gov lists trials that are studying or have studied Cyclic vomiting syndrome. Click on the link to go to ClinicalTrials.gov to read descriptions of these studies.
Other Names for this Disease
  • CVS
  • Familial cyclic vomiting syndrome (subtype)
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.