Your browser does not support javascript:   Search for gard hereSearch for news-and-events here.

Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Print friendly version

Evans syndrome


Other Names for this Disease

  • Autoimmune hemolytic anemia and autoimmune thrombocytopenia
  • Evan syndrome
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Symptoms

Newline Maker

What are the signs and symptoms of Evans syndrome?

The signs and symptoms of Evans syndrome vary from person to person and largely depend on which type(s) of blood cells are affected (i.e. platelets, white blood cells, or red blood cells). If a person does not have enough healthy red blood cells (anemia), they may experience weakness, fatigue, paleness, light-headedness, and shortness of breath. Low platelets can cause easy or unexplained bruising; prolonged bleeding from small cuts; and purpura. People with low white blood cells may be more susceptible to infections.[1]

Many people with Evans syndrome go through periods of remission in which the signs and symptoms of the condition temporarily disappear or become less severe.[1]
Last updated: 11/16/2014

The Human Phenotype Ontology provides the following list of signs and symptoms for Evans syndrome. If the information is available, the table below includes how often the symptom is seen in people with this condition. You can use the MedlinePlus Medical Dictionary to look up the definitions for these medical terms.

Signs and Symptoms Approximate number of patients (when available)
Autoimmune thrombocytopenia -
Autosomal recessive inheritance -
Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia -
Spastic paraplegia -

Last updated: 11/3/2014

The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) has collected information on how often a sign or symptom occurs in a condition. Much of this information comes from Orphanet, a European rare disease database. The frequency of a sign or symptom is usually listed as a rough estimate of the percentage of patients who have that feature.

The frequency may also be listed as a fraction. The first number of the fraction is how many people had the symptom, and the second number is the total number of people who were examined in one study. For example, a frequency of 25/25 means that in a study of 25 people all patients were found to have that symptom. Because these frequencies are based on a specific study, the fractions may be different if another group of patients are examined.

Sometimes, no information on frequency is available. In these cases, the sign or symptom may be rare or common.


References
  1. Prasad Mathew, MBBS, DCH. Evans Syndrome. Medscape. January 8, 2014; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/955266-overview#a0101. Accessed 11/16/2014.


Other Names for this Disease
  • Autoimmune hemolytic anemia and autoimmune thrombocytopenia
  • Evan syndrome
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.