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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification


Other Names for this Disease

  • Bilateral striopallidodentate calcinosis
  • BSPDC
  • Cerebral calcification nonarteriosclerotic idiopathic adult-onset
  • Fahr disease, familial (formerly)
  • Ferrocalcinosis, cerebrovascular
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Treatment

Newline Maker

How might familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (FIBGC) be treated?

There is no standard course of treatment for FIBGC. Treatment typically addresses symptoms on an individual basis. Medications may be used to improve anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive behaviors, and dystoniaAntiepileptic drugs (AEDs) can be prescribed for seizures. Oxybutynin may be prescribed for urinary incontinence (loss of bladder control). Surveillance typically includes yearly neurologic and neuropsychiatric assessments.[1]
Last updated: 8/2/2013

References
  1. Sobrido MJ, Coppola G, Oliveira J, Hopfer S, Geschwind DH. Familial Idiopathic Basal Ganglia Calcification. GeneReviews. June 27, 2013; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1421/. Accessed 10/18/2013.


Management Guidelines

  • GeneReviews provides current, expert-authored, peer-reviewed, full-text articles describing the application of genetic testing to the diagnosis, management, and genetic counseling of patients with specific inherited conditions. Click on the link to view the article on this topic.

Clinical Trials & Research for this Disease

  • The Centers for Mendelian Genomics program is working to discover the causes of rare genetic disorders. For more information about applying to the research study, please visit their website.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Bilateral striopallidodentate calcinosis
  • BSPDC
  • Cerebral calcification nonarteriosclerotic idiopathic adult-onset
  • Fahr disease, familial (formerly)
  • Ferrocalcinosis, cerebrovascular
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.