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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome


Other Names for this Disease
  • GCPS
  • Greig syndrome
  • Polysyndactyly with peculiar skull shape
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Symptoms


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What are the signs and symptoms of Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome?

The features of Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome are highly variable, ranging from very mild to severe. People with this condition typically have one or more extra fingers or toes (polydactyly) or an abnormally wide thumb or big toe (hallux). The skin between the fingers and toes may be fused (cutaneous syndactyly). This disorder is also characterized by widely spaced eyes (ocular hypertelorism), an abnormally large head size (macrocephaly), and a high, prominent forehead. Rarely, affected individuals may have more serious medical problems including seizures, developmental delay, and intellectual disability.[1]
Last updated: 4/8/2011

References
  1. Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome. Genetics Home Reference (GHR). 2006; http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/greig-cephalopolysyndactyly-syndrome. Accessed 4/8/2011.