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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Horner's syndrome


Other Names for this Disease

  • Bernard-Horner Syndrome
  • Oculosympathetic Palsy
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Your Question

I have Horner's Syndrome which is believed to have been caused by a thoracic spinal tumor. I have all of the symptoms, except that of my eye retracting back into the socket. Will the syndrome keep progressing now that the tumor has been removed? Is that something I should be watching for?

Our Answer

We have identified the following information that we hope you find helpful. If you still have questions, please contact us.

I have Horner syndrome, am I at risk for my eye to sink back in its socket (enophthalmos)?

No. It was once thought that Horner syndrome causes enophthalmos, however studies have shown that this is not the case. While Horner syndrome can give the appearance of enophthalmos, actual measurements support that enophthalmos is not a feature of Horner syndrome.[1][2]
Last updated: 8/14/2014

References
  • van der Wiel HL, van Gijn J. No enophthalmos in Horner's syndrome. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 1987 Apr; 50(4):498-9. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1031897/. Accessed 8/14/2014.
  • Lepore FE. Enophthalmos and Horner's syndrome. Arch Neurol. Jul 1983; 40(7):460. Accessed 8/14/2014.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Bernard-Horner Syndrome
  • Oculosympathetic Palsy
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.