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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Osteosarcoma


Other Names for this Disease

  • Osteogenic sarcoma
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Overview

Osteosarcoma is the most common cancerous (malignant) bone tumor in youth. The average age at diagnosis is 15. Boys and girls have a similar incidence of this tumor until late adolescence, at which time boys are more commonly affected. In rare cases, osteosarcoma occurs in adults. The cause of osteosarcoma is not known. In some cases, it runs in families, and at least one gene has been linked to increased risk. Although osteosarcoma tends to occur in the larger bones, such as the shin (near the knee), thigh (near the knee) and upper arm (near the shoulder), it can occur in any bone.[1] A number of variants of osteosarcoma exist, including conventional types (osteoblastic, chondroblastic, and fibroblastic), telangiectatic, multifocal, parosteal, and periosteal.[2] Treatment usually starts after a biopsy of the tumor and includes chemotherapy followed by surgery.[1]
Last updated: 6/7/2009

References

  1. Grund S. Osteosarcoma. MedlinePlus. 2008; http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001650.htm. Accessed 6/7/2009.
  2. Mehlman CT, Cripe TP. Osteosarcoma. eMedicine. 2008; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1256857-overview. Accessed 6/7/2009.
Your Questions Answered
by the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

Please contact us with your questions about Osteosarcoma. We will answer your question and update these pages with new resources and information.

Basic Information

  • The American Cancer Society provides a detailed guide on osteosarcoma. Click on the above link to access this information.
  • MedlinePlus was designed by the National Library of Medicine to help you research your health questions, and it provides more information about this topic.
  • The Merck Manuals Online Medical Library provides information on this condition for patients and caregivers. 
  • The National Cancer Institute provides the most current information on cancer for patients, health professionals, and the general public.  Click on the link to view information on this topic. 

In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. Click on the link to view this information. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is an catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. Each entry has a summary of related medical articles. It is meant for health care professionals and researchers. OMIM is maintained by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. 
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs.  Access to this database is free of charge.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Osteosarcoma. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.

Insurance Issues

Other Names for this Disease
  • Osteogenic sarcoma
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.