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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Dense deposit disease


Other Names for this Disease

  • DDD
  • Glomerulonephritis membranoproliferative type 2
  • Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type 2
  • Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type II
  • Mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis type 2
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Cause

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What causes dense deposit disease?

Dense deposit disease (DDD) can have genetic or non-genetic causes. When the condition is genetic, it may be associated with changes in several genes. Mutations that cause the condition have been identified in the C3 and CFH genes, but they account for only a small percentage of all cases. There are also variants of some genes (C3, CFH and CFHR5) that do not directly cause the condition, but increase the likelihood of developing the condition. Most people with these variants do not develop the condition.[1]

Most people with DDD do not have disease-causing mutations in the C3, CFH, or CFHR5 genes. The condition may develop due to a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors ("triggers"), most of which are unknown. The condition can also be caused by the presence of specific proteins called autoantibodies that block the activity of proteins needed for the body's immune response.[1]
Last updated: 2/24/2014

References
  1. Dense Deposit Disease. Genetics Home Reference. February, 2011; http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/dense-deposit-disease. Accessed 2/24/2014.


Other Names for this Disease
  • DDD
  • Glomerulonephritis membranoproliferative type 2
  • Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type 2
  • Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type II
  • Mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis type 2
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.