Your browser does not support javascript:   Search for gard hereSearch for news-and-events here.

Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Print friendly version

Acquired angioedema


Other Names for this Disease

  • Acquired C1 inhibitor deficiency
  • Angioedema, acquired
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Symptoms

Newline Maker

What are the signs and symptoms of acquired angioedema?

Apart from negative family history and age of onset, acquired angioedema (AAE) cannot be distinguished from hereditary angioedema. People with AAE typically report no family history, and onset is most commonly after the fourth decade of life.

People with AAE have recurrent episodes of edema (swelling) at various locations of the face and/or body, usually lasting 48-72 hours, but they can persist for up to 5 days on rare occasions. The edema usually does not repsond to antihistamines. The frequency of attacks is unpredictable and varies widely among affected people.

Edema may affect subcutaneous tissues (such as the face, hands, arms, legs, genitals, or buttocks). Abdominal organs (such as the stomach, intestines, or bladder) may also be affected and may result in nausea, vomiting, and/or colicky pain and mimic a surgical emergency. The upper airway (such as the larynx) can also be affected. Swelling of the face and extremities is reported most commonly.

When AAE is associated with an underlying disorder such as a lymphoproliferative cancer or connective tissue disease, symptoms associated with those conditions may also be present.[1]
Last updated: 8/25/2014

References
  1. Ru'aa Al Harithy. Acquired Angioedema. Medscape Reference. July 31, 2014; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1048887-overview. Accessed 8/25/2014.


Other Names for this Disease
  • Acquired C1 inhibitor deficiency
  • Angioedema, acquired
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.