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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Abdominal aortic aneurysm


Other Names for this Disease

  • Aneurysm, abdominal aortic
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Inheritance

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Is abdominal aortic aneurysm inherited?

Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is thought to be a multifactorial condition, meaning that one or more genes likely interact with environmental factors to cause the condition. In some cases, it may occur as part of an inherited syndrome.[1]

Having a family history of AAA increases the risk of developing the condition. A genetic predisposition has been suspected since the first report of three brothers who had a ruptured AAA, and additional families with multiple affected relatives have been reported.[2] In some cases, it may be referred to as " familial abdominal aortic aneurysm."[1] A Swedish survey reported that the relative risk of developing AAA for a first-degree relative of a person with AAA was approximately double that of a person with no family history of AAA. In another study, having a family history increased the risk of having an aneurysm 4.3-fold. The highest risk was among brothers older than age 60, in whom the prevalence was 18%.[2]

While specific variations in DNA (polymorphisms) are known or suspected to increase the risk for AAA, no one gene is known to cause isolated AAA. It can occur with some inherited disorders that are caused by mutations in a single gene, such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, vascular type. However, these more typically involve the thoracoabdominal aorta.[2]

Because the inheritance of AAA is complex, it is not possible to predict whether a specific person will develop AAA. People interested in learning more about the genetics of AAA, and how their family history affects risks to specific family members, should speak with a genetics professional.
Last updated: 2/26/2014

References
  1. Ada Hamosh. AORTIC ANEURYSM, FAMILIAL ABDOMINAL, 1; AAA1. OMIM. December 20, 2011; http://omim.org/entry/100070. Accessed 2/25/2014.
  2. Emile R Mohler III. Epidemiology, risk factors, pathogenesis and natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysm. UpToDate. Waltham, MA: UpToDate; February, 2014; Accessed 2/25/2014.


Other Names for this Disease
  • Aneurysm, abdominal aortic
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.