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Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Spastic diplegia cerebral palsy


Other Names for this Disease
  • Cerebral palsy spastic diplegic
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Overview

Spastic diplegia cerebral palsy is a form of cerebral palsy, a neurological condition that usually appears in infancy or early childhood and permanently affects muscle control and coordination. Affected people have increased muscle tone which leads to spasticity (stiff or tight muscles and exaggerated reflexes) in the legs. The arm muscles are generally less affected or not affected at all. Other signs and symptoms may include delayed motor or movement milestones (i.e. rolling over, sitting, standing); walking on toes; and a "scissored" gait (style of walking).[1][2] It occurs when the portion of the brain that controls movement is damaged or develops abnormally. The exact underlying cause is often unknown; however, the condition has been associated with genetic abnormalities; congenital brain malformations; maternal infections or fevers; and/or injury before, during or shortly after birth.[1][3] There is no cure, and treatment options vary depending on the signs and symptoms present in each person and the severity of the condition.[1][4]
Last updated: 1/6/2014

References

  1. Cerebral Palsy: Hope Through Research. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. November 2014; http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/cerebral_palsy/detail_cerebral_palsy.htm.
  2. Facts About Cerebral Palsy. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. November 2014; http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/cp/facts.html.
  3. Cerebral Palsy. NORD. February 2008; http://www.rarediseases.org/rare-disease-information/rare-diseases/byID/63/viewAbstract.
  4. Hoda Z Abdel-Hamid, MD. Cerebral Palsy. Medscape Reference. June 2013; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1179555-overview.
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Please contact us with your questions about Spastic diplegia cerebral palsy. We will answer your question and update these pages with new resources and information.

Basic Information

  • You can obtain information on this topic from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC is recognized as the lead federal agency for developing and applying disease prevention and control, environmental health, and health promotion and education activities designed to improve the health of the people of the United States.
  • MedlinePlus was designed by the National Library of Medicine to help you research your health questions, and it provides more information about this topic.
  • The Merck Manuals Online Medical Library provides information on this condition for patients and caregivers. 
  • The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) collects and disseminates research information related to neurological disorders. Click on the link to view information on this topic.
  • The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) is a federation of more than 130 nonprofit voluntary health organizations serving people with rare disorders. Click on the link to view information on this topic.

In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. Click on the link to view this information. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • The Merck Manual for health care professionals provides information on Spastic diplegia cerebral palsy.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Spastic diplegia cerebral palsy. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Cerebral palsy spastic diplegic
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.