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Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Lipodermatosclerosis


Other Names for this Disease

  • Acute lipodermatosclerosis
  • Hypodermitis sclerodermaformis
  • Sclerosing panniculitis
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Overview

Lipodermatosclerosis refers to changes in the skin of the lower legs. It is a form of panniculitis (inflammation of the layer of fat under the skin). Signs and symptoms include pain, hardening of skin, change in skin color (redness), swelling, and a tapering of the legs above the ankles.[1][2] The exact underlying cause is unknown; however, it appears to be associated with venous insufficiency and/or obesity. Treatment usually includes compression therapy.[2]
Last updated: 12/31/2014

References

  1. Bruce AJ. et al. Lipodermatosclerosis: Review of cases evaluated at Mayo Clinic. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2002;
  2. Mark Duffill. Lipodermatosclerosis. DermNet NZ. December 2013; http://www.dermnetnz.org/vascular/lipodermatosclerosis.html.
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Basic Information

  • DermNet NZ is an online resource about skin diseases developed by the New Zealand Dermatological Society Incorporated. DermNet NZ provides information about this condition.

In Depth Information

  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Lipodermatosclerosis. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Acute lipodermatosclerosis
  • Hypodermitis sclerodermaformis
  • Sclerosing panniculitis
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.