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Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Schistosomiasis


Other Names for this Disease

  • Bilharzia
  • Blood fluke
  • Katayama fever
  • Schistosoma mansoni infection
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Overview

Schistosomiasis is a disease caused by parasitic worms. Although the worms that cause schistosomiasis are not found in the United States, more than 200 million people are infected worldwide.[1] Infection occurs through contact with contaminated water. The parasite in its infective stages is called a cercaria. It swims freely in open bodies of water. On contact with humans, the parasite burrows into the skin, matures into another stage (schistosomula), then migrates to the lungs and liver, where it matures into the adult form. The adult worm then migrates to its preferred body part (bladder, rectum, intestines, liver, portal venous system (the veins that carry blood from the intestines to liver, spleen, lungs), depending on its species.[2]  Schistosomiasis is common in many tropical and subtropical areas worldwide. It can be treated safely and effectively with praziquantel.[1][2]
Last updated: 3/15/2013

References

  1. Schistosomiasis FAQs. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). November 2012; http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/schistosomiasis/gen_info/faqs.html. Accessed 3/15/2013.
  2. Schistosomiasis. MedlinePlus. October 2012; http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001321.htm. Accessed 3/15/2013.
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Basic Information

  • You can obtain information on this topic from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC is recognized as the lead federal agency for developing and applying disease prevention and control, environmental health, and health promotion and education activities designed to improve the health of the people of the United States.
  • MedlinePlus was designed by the National Library of Medicine to help you research your health questions, and it provides more information about this topic.
  • The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) launched the Neglected Tropical Diseases Initiative in 2006, the first global effort to support country programs to integrate and scale up delivery of preventive medication for five neglected tropical diseases: lymphatic filariasis, schistosomiasis, trachoma, onchocerciasis, and soil-transmitted helminthiasis. Click on the link to view information on this condition.

In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. Click on the link to view this information. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is an catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. Each entry has a summary of related medical articles. It is meant for health care professionals and researchers. OMIM is maintained by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. 
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs.  Access to this database is free of charge.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Schistosomiasis. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Bilharzia
  • Blood fluke
  • Katayama fever
  • Schistosoma mansoni infection
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.