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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Lymphangioma


Other Names for this Disease

  • Lymphangiomas
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Treatment

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How might a lymphangioma be treated?

The best treatment options for lymphangioma depend on many factors including the size and location of the mass; the type of mass; whether or not the mass is causing symptoms; and/or the affected person's tolerance of certain procedures.[1] Cystic hygromas and cavernous lymphangioma (bluish or red rubbery swellings under the skin) are often surgically removed; however, other procedures such as sclerotherapy (a solution is injected into the lymphangioma, causing it to shrink or collapse), laser therapy or radiofrequency ablation (a needle is used to deliver a high-frequency alternating current that destroys abnormal tissue), may be tried depending on the size and location of the mass. Unfortunately, some of these masses may be difficult to remove and they often regrow after surgery.[1][2][3]

Lymphangioma circumscriptum (clusters of small, firm blisters) usually require no treatment, although they can be removed with dermabrasion or laser therapy. Like other types of lymphangioma, they often recur after removal.[3]

Last updated: 12/21/2014

References
  1. Lymphatic Malformations. NORD. June 2011; https://www.rarediseases.org/rare-disease-information/rare-diseases/byID/646/viewAbstract.
  2. Robert A Schwartz, MD, MPH. Lymphangioma. Medscape Reference. May 2014; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1086806-overview.
  3. Lymphatic malformation. DermNet NZ. December 2014; http://dermnetnz.org/vascular/lymphangioma.html.


Clinical Trials & Research for this Disease

  • ClinicalTrials.gov lists trials that are studying or have studied Lymphangioma. Click on the link to go to ClinicalTrials.gov to read descriptions of these studies.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Lymphangiomas
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.