Disease at a Glance

Summary
Hematohidrosis is a rare condition characterized by blood oozing from intact skin and mucosa. Signs and symptoms include sweating blood, crying bloody tears, bleeding from the nose, bleeding from the ears, or oozing blood from other skin surfaces. The episodes are usually self-limiting. In some cases, the fluid appears to be blood tinged, while others resemble frank blood. It can occur on any part of the body, but most commonly appears on the face (ear, nose, and eyes). The cause is unknown. The bleeding is due to the rupture of the very small blood vessels of the skin (dermal capillaries). Some cases are associated with systemic disease, bleeding disorders, menstruation, excessive exertion, high blood pressure, fear and intense emotional stress.
Resource(s) for Medical Professionals and Scientists on This Disease:
This section is currently in development.

About Hematohidrosis

Many rare diseases have limited information. Currently GARD aims to provide the following information for this disease:

  • Population Estimate:This section is currently in development.
  • Symptoms:This section is currently in development.
  • Cause:GARD does not currently have information about the cause of this condition.
  • Organizations:GARD is not currently aware of organizations specific to this condition.
When Do Symptoms of Hematohidrosis Begin?
This section is currently in development. 

Symptoms

This information is currently in development. 

Causes

This section is currently in development. 

Advocacy and Support Groups

How Can Patient Organizations Help?

Patient organizations can help patients and families connect. They build public awareness of the disease and are a driving force behind research to improve patients' lives. They may offer online and in-person resources to help people live well with their disease. Many collaborate with medical experts and researchers.

Services of patient organizations differ, but may include:

  • Ways to connect to others and share personal stories
  • Easy-to-read information
  • Up-to-date treatment and research information
  • Patient registries
  • Lists of specialists or specialty centers
  • Financial aid and travel resources

Please note: GARD provides organizations for informational purposes only and not as an endorsement of their services. Please contact an organization directly if you have questions about the information or resources it provides.

Patient Organizations

4 Organizations

Organization Name

Who They Serve

Helpful Links

Country

People With

Rare Diseases

Helpful Links
Country

United States

People With

Rare Diseases

Helpful Links
Country

United States

People With

Rare Diseases

Helpful Links
Country

United States

People With

Rare Diseases

Helpful Links
Country

United States

Participating in Clinical Studies

Clinical studies are part of clinical research and at the heart of all medical advances, including rare diseases. Participating in research helps researchers ultimately uncover better ways to treat, prevent, diagnose, and understand human diseases.

What Are Clinical Studies?

  1. Clinical trials determine if a new test or treatment for a disease is effective and safe by comparing groups receiving different tests/treatments.
  2. Observational studies involve recording changes over time among a specific group of people in their natural settings.
Learn more about the different types of clinical studies, consent forms, questions you should ask before participating in clinical studies, and the difference between research and medical treatment.

Why Participate in Clinical Studies?

How Do You Find the Right Clinical Study?

  • Use ClincalTrials.gov button below to search for studies by disease, terms, or country.
  • Consult doctors, other trusted medical professionals, and patient organizations.
  • Enroll in databases to allow researchers from participating institutions to find you.

What if There Are No Available Clinical Studies?

What Are Clinical Studies?

  1. Clinical trials determine if a new test or treatment for a disease is effective and safe by comparing groups receiving different tests/treatments.
  2. Observational studies involve recording changes over time among a specific group of people in their natural settings.
Learn more about the different types of clinical studies, consent forms, questions you should ask before participating in clinical studies, and the difference between research and medical treatment.

Why Participate in Clinical Studies?

How Do You Find the Right Clinical Study?

  • Use ClincalTrials.gov button below to search for studies by disease, terms, or country.
  • Consult doctors, other trusted medical professionals, and patient organizations.
  • Enroll in databases to allow researchers from participating institutions to find you.

What if There Are No Available Clinical Studies?

ClinicalTrials.gov, an affiliate of NIH, provides current information on clinical research studies in the United States and abroad. Talk to a trusted doctor before choosing to participate in any clinical study. We recommend checking this site often and searching for studies with related terms/synonyms to improve results.
Please contact GARD if you need help finding additional information or resources on rare diseases, including clinical studies. Our Information Specialists are available to you by phone or by filling out our contact form. Note, GARD cannot enroll individuals in clinical studies.
ClinicalTrials.gov, an affiliate of NIH, provides current information on clinical research studies in the United States and abroad. Talk to a trusted doctor before choosing to participate in any clinical study. We recommend checking this site often and searching for studies with related terms/synonyms to improve results.
Please contact GARD if you need help finding additional information or resources on rare diseases, including clinical studies. Our Information Specialists are available to you by phone or by filling out our contact form. Note, GARD cannot enroll individuals in clinical studies.

Take steps toward getting a diagnosis by working with your doctor, finding the right specialists, and coordinating medical care.

Last Updated: February 2023