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Disease at a Glance

Summary
A rare ectodermal dysplasia syndrome with bone abnormalities characterized by onychodystrophy; anomalies of the lower jaw, oral vestibule and dentition; post-axialpolydactyly; moderately restricted growth with short limbs; and normal intelligence. Although it closely resembles Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (see this term), an allelic disorder and another type of ciliopathy, WAD is usually a milder disease without the presence of heart abnormalities and is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.
Summary
A rare ectodermal dysplasia syndrome with bone abnormalities characterized by onychodystrophy; anomalies of the lower jaw, oral vestibule and dentition; post-axialpolydactyly; moderately restricted growth with short limbs; and normal intelligence. Although it closely resembles Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (see this term), an allelic disorder and another type of ciliopathy, WAD is usually a milder disease without the presence of heart abnormalities and is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.A rare ectodermal dysplasia syndrome with bone abnormalities characterized by onychodystrophy; anomalies of the lower jaw, oral vestibule and dentition; post-axialpolydactyly; moderately restricted growth with short limbs; and normal intelligence. Although it closely resembles Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (see this term), an allelic disorder and another type of ciliopathy, WAD is usually a milder disease without the presence of heart abnormalities and is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.
Resource(s) for Medical Professionals and Scientists on This Disease:
  • Orphanet  provides GARD with information for this disease.
  • RARe-SOURCE™  offers rare disease gene variant annotations and links to rare disease gene literature.

About Acrofacial dysostosis, Weyers type

Many rare diseases have limited information. Currently GARD aims to provide the following information for this disease:

  • Population Estimate:This section is currently indevelopment.
  • Symptoms:May start to appear as a Newborn.
  • Cause:This disease is caused by a change in the genetic material (DNA).
  • Organizations:Patient organizations are available to help find a specialist, or advocacy and support for this specific disease.
  • Categories:Birth DefectsGenetic DiseasesSkin Diseases
When Do Symptoms of Acrofacial dysostosis, Weyers type Begin?
Symptoms of this disease may start to appear as a Newborn.

The age symptoms may begin to appear differs between diseases. Symptoms may begin in a single age range, or during several age ranges. The symptoms from some diseases may begin at any age. Knowing when symptoms began to appear can help medical providers find the correct diagnosis.
Prenatal
Before Birth
Newborn Selected
Birth-4 weeks
Infant
1-23 months
Child
2-11 years
Adolescent
12-18 years
Adult
19-65 years
Older Adult
65+ years
Symptoms may start to appear as a Newborn.

Symptoms

The types of symptoms experienced, and their intensity, may vary among people with this disease. Your experience may be different from others, and you should consult your primary care provider (PCP) for more information.

This list does not include all possible symptoms related to this disease, but they may include:
Skin System Skin System

19 Symptoms

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Body Systems

Symptoms related to this disease may affect different systems of the body. Use the 'Filter and Sort' function to learn more about which body system(s) are affected by this disease and their associated symptom(s).

Causes

Genetic Disease

Acrofacial dysostosis, Weyers type is a genetic disease. This means that one or more genes have differences that prevent them from working correctly.

Certain variants in the following gene(s) are known to cause this disease: EVC2, EVC

What Is a Gene?

Inheritance

All individuals inherit two copies of most genes. The number of copies of a gene that need to have a disease-causing variant affects the way a disease is inherited. This disease is inherited in the following pattern(s):

Autosomal Dominant

Advocacy and Support Groups

How Can Patient Organizations Help?

Patient organizations can help patients and families connect. They build public awareness of the disease and are a driving force behind research to improve patients' lives. They may offer online and in-person resources to help people live well with their disease. Many collaborate with medical experts and researchers.

Services of patient organizations differ, but may include:

  • Ways to connect to others and share personal stories
  • Easy-to-read information
  • Up-to-date treatment and research information
  • Patient registries
  • Lists of specialists or specialty centers
  • Financial aid and travel resources

Please note: GARD provides organizations for informational purposes only and not as an endorsement of their services. Please contact an organization directly if you have questions about the information or resources it provides.

Patient Organizations

5 Organizations

Organization Name

Who They Serve

Helpful Links

Country

People With

Acrofacial Dysostosis, Weyers Type

Helpful Links
Country

United States

People With

Rare Diseases

Helpful Links
Country

United States

People With

Rare Diseases

Helpful Links
Country

United States

People With

Rare Diseases

Helpful Links
Country

United States

People With

Rare Diseases

Helpful Links
Country

United States

Participating in Clinical Studies

Clinical studies are part of clinical research and at the heart of all medical advances, including rare diseases. Participating in research helps researchers ultimately uncover better ways to treat, prevent, diagnose, and understand human diseases.

What Are Clinical Studies?

  1. Clinical trials determine if a new test or treatment for a disease is effective and safe by comparing groups receiving different tests/treatments.
  2. Observational studies involve recording changes over time among a specific group of people in their natural settings.
Learn more about clinical trials from this U.S. Food & Drug Administration webpage.

Why Participate in Clinical Studies?

Join the All of Us Research Program!

What if There Are No Available Clinical Studies?

What Are Clinical Studies?

Clinical studies are medical research involving people as participants. There are two main types of clinical studies:
  1. Clinical trials determine if a new test or treatment for a disease is effective and safe by comparing groups receiving different tests/treatments.
  2. Observational studies involve recording changes over time among a specific group of people in their natural settings.
Learn more about clinical trials from this U.S. Food & Drug Administration webpage.
Read More

Why Participate in Clinical Studies?

People participate in clinical trials for many reasons. People with a disease may participate to receive the newest possible treatment and additional care from clinical study staff as well as to help others living with the same or similar disease. Healthy volunteers may participate to help others and to contribute to moving science forward.

To find the right clinical study we recommend you consult your doctors, other trusted medical professionals, and patient organizations. Additionally, you can use ClinicalTrials.gov to search for clinical studies by disease, terms, or location.
Read More

Join the All of Us Research Program!

What if There Are No Available Clinical Studies?

ClinicalTrials.gov, an affiliate of NIH, provides current information on clinical research studies in the United States and abroad. Talk to a trusted doctor before choosing to participate in any clinical study. We recommend checking this site often and searching for studies with related terms/synonyms to improve results.
Please contact GARD if you need help finding additional information or resources on rare diseases, including clinical studies. Note, GARD cannot enroll individuals in clinical studies.
Available toll-free Monday through Friday from 12 pm to 6 pm Eastern Time
(Except: Federal Holidays)
Use the contact form to send your questions to a GARD Information Specialist.

Please allow 2 to 10 business days for us to respond.
ClinicalTrials.gov, an affiliate of NIH, provides current information on clinical research studies in the United States and abroad. Talk to a trusted doctor before choosing to participate in any clinical study. We recommend checking this site often and searching for studies with related terms/synonyms to improve results.
Please contact GARD if you need help finding additional information or resources on rare diseases, including clinical studies. Note, GARD cannot enroll individuals in clinical studies.
Available toll-free Monday through Friday from 12 pm to 6 pm Eastern Time
(Except: Federal Holidays)
Use the contact form to send your questions to a GARD Information Specialist.

Please allow 2 to 10 business days for us to respond.
Getting a Diagnosis

Take steps toward getting a diagnosis by working with your doctor, finding the right specialists, and coordinating medical care.

Last Updated: February 2023