Disease at a Glance

Summary
Blue diaper syndrome is a rare metabolic disorder characterized by problems in the absorption of the aminoacid tryptophan and blue urine stains on diapers. Symptoms typically include digestive problems, fever, irritability, failure to thrive, and visual problems. The abnormally high levels of calcium in the blood (hypercalcemia) may result in accumulation of calcium in the kidneys (nephrocalcinosis) leading to impaired kidney function and possible kidney failure. The bluish urine-stained diapers occur when intestinal bacteria break down excessive amounts of tryptophan, a nutrient of the diet, leading to increase of indican and related compounds in the urine (indicanuria). Although the exact nature of the biochemical defect remains uncertain, it is believed to be related to a defect in the intestinal absorption and transport of tryptophan. The defect in tryptophan absorption may be associated with genetic changes in the LAT2 and TAT1 genes. Inheritance is autosomal recessive or X-linked recessive.
Estimated Number of People with this Disease

This section is currently in development.

What Information Does GARD Have For This Disease?

Many rare diseases have limited information. Currently GARD is able to provide the following information for this disease:

*Data may be currently unavailable to GARD at this time.
When do symptoms of this disease begin?
This section is currently in development. 

Symptoms

These symptoms may be different from person to person. Some people may have more symptoms than others and symptoms can range from mild to severe. This list does not include every symptom.
This disease might cause these symptoms:
Digestive System

5 Symptoms

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Digestive System

The digestive system is made up of the esophagus, stomach, intestines, liver, pancreas, and gallbladder. Common symptoms of problems in the digestive system include blood in the stool, changes in bowel habits, severe abdominal pain, unintentional weight loss, or heartburn. Diseases affecting the digestive system may be diagnosed and treated by a gastroenterologist (GI specialist).

Causes

This section is currently in development. 

Last Updated: Nov. 8, 2021