Disease at a Glance

Summary
Hereditary amyloidosis refers to a group of inherited conditions that make up one of the subtypes of amyloidosis. Hereditary amyloidosis is characterized by the deposit of an abnormal protein called amyloid in multiple organs of the body where it should not be, which causes disruption of organ tissue structure and function. In Hereditary amyloidosis, amyloid deposits most often occur in tissues of the heart, kidneys, and nervous system. While symptoms of Hereditary amyloidosis may appear in childhood, most individuals do not experience symptoms until adulthood. There are many types of Hereditary amyloidosis associated with different genetic changes and abnormal proteins. The most common type of Hereditary amyloidosis is transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR), a condition in which the amyloid deposits are most often made up of the transthyretin protein which is made in the liver. Other examples of Hereditary amyloidosis include, but are not limited to, apolipoprotein AI amyloidosis (A ApoAI), gelsolin amyloidosis (A Gel), lysozyme amyloidosis (A Lys), cystatin C amyloidosis (A Cys), fibrinogen Aα-chain amyloidosis (A Fib), and apolipoprotein AII amyloidosis (A ApoAII). Most types of Hereditary amyloidosis are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.
Estimated Number of People with this Disease

This section is currently in development.

What Information Does GARD Have For This Disease?

Many rare diseases have limited information. Currently GARD is able to provide the following information for this disease:

*Data may be currently unavailable to GARD at this time.
Categories
When do symptoms of this disease begin?
This section is currently in development. 

Symptoms

This section is currently in development. We recommend speaking with a doctor to learn more about this disease. 

Causes

This section is currently in development. 

Last Updated: Nov. 8, 2021