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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Crohn's disease

*

* Not a rare disease

Other Names for this Disease
  • Ileitis
  • Enteritis
  • Granulomatous colitis
  • Granulomatous enteritis
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Overview

Crohn's disease is a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the general name for conditions that cause inflammation in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Common signs and symptoms include abdominal pain and cramping, diarrhea, and weight loss. Other general symptoms include feeling tired, nausea and loss of appetite, fever, and anemia. Complications of Crohn's disease may include intestinal blockage, fistulas, anal fissures, ulcers, malnutrition, and inflammation in other areas of the body. Crohn's disease can occur in people of all age groups but is most often diagnosed in young adults. The exact cause is unknown, but is thought to involve both genetic and environmental factors. It appears to run in some families. Treatment is aimed at relieving symptoms and reducing inflammation, but some people require surgery.[1][2]
Last updated: 3/15/2016

References

  1. Crohn's disease. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). September 2014; http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/digestive-diseases/crohns-disease/Pages/facts.aspx.
  2. Aaron E. Walfish, David B. Sachar. Crohn Disease. Merck Manual Consumer Version. 2016; http://www.merckmanuals.com/home/digestive-disorders/inflammatory-bowel-diseases-ibd/crohn-disease?qt=&sc=&alt=.
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Basic Information

  • Just Like Me! , a Web site for kids and teens with ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease sponsored by the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA).
  • Genetics Home Reference (GHR) contains information on Crohn's disease. This website is maintained by the National Library of Medicine.
  • MedlinePlus was designed by the National Library of Medicine to help you research your health questions, and it provides more information about this topic.
  • The Merck Manuals Online Medical Library provides information on this condition for patients and caregivers. 
  • The National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC), part of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), offers information on this condition. Click on the link to view information on this topic.
  • The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) has a report for patients and families about this condition. NORD is a patient advocacy organization for individuals with rare diseases and the organizations that serve them.

In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. Each entry has a summary of related medical articles. It is meant for health care professionals and researchers. OMIM is maintained by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. 
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs. Access to this database is free of charge.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Crohn's disease. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Ileitis
  • Enteritis
  • Granulomatous colitis
  • Granulomatous enteritis
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.