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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Aquagenic pruritus


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Treatment

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How might aquagenic pruritus be treated?

The underlying cause of aquagenic pruritus is not well understood which complicates the decision about what therapy might be best for treatment.[1][2][3] Various options have been tried with varying success. Antihistamines are the mainstay of treatment. Other therapies that have been tried include adding adding sodium bicarbonate to bath water, topical capsaicin, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, UVB phototherapy, PUVA therapy, naltrexone, propranolol, and atenolol.[1][2]  

Last updated: 6/21/2016

References
  1. Sekar CS, Srinivas CR & Jacob S. Aquagenic pruritus: beneath water "lies". Indian J Dermatol. 2011 Jul; 56(4):446-7. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3179019/.
  2. Cao T, Yong AA, Tan KB, Tey HL. Idiopathic aquagenic pruritus: pathogenesis and effective treatment with atenolol.. Dermatol Ther. 2015 May-Jun; 28(3):118-21. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25640024.
  3. Heitkemper T, Hofmann T, Phan NQ, Ständer S. Aquagenic pruritus: associated diseases and clinical pruritus characteristics.. J Dtsch Dermatol Ges. 2010 Oct; 8(10):797-804. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20546386. Accessed 9/28/2015.


Clinical Trials & Research for this Disease

  • ClinicalTrials.gov lists trials that are studying or have studied Aquagenic pruritus. Click on the link to go to ClinicalTrials.gov to read descriptions of these studies.
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.