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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Benign rolandic epilepsy (BRE)


Other Names for this Disease
  • Benign rolandic epilepsy of childhood (BREC)
  • Benign epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes (BECTS)
  • Benign epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes (BECCT)
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Overview

Benign rolandic epilepsy is the most common form of childhood epilepsy. It is referred to as "benign" because most children outgrow the condition by puberty. This form of epilepsy is characterized by seizures involving the part of the frontal lobe of the brain called the rolandic area.[1] Onset of seizures is usually between 3-12 years of age. The seizures associated with this condition typically occur during the nighttime.[2] Other features of benign rolandic epilepsy might include headaches or migraines and behavioral and/or learning differences.[3] Benign rolandic epilepsy is thought to have a genetic etiology as there is often an associated family history of epilepsy. A single causative gene mutation has not yet been identified, although studies have implicated different areas on chromosomes that might be involved.[3][4] Treatment is usually not indicated; however for individuals that have seizures in the daytime, common seizure medications such as Trileptal, Tegretol, and Keppra might be prescribed.[1]
Last updated: 4/22/2016

References

  1. Gregory L. Holmes, MD, Robert S. Fisher, MD, PhD , Angel Hernandez, MD. Benign Rolandic Epilepsy. Epilepsy Foundation. 2/2015; http://www.epilepsy.com/learn/types-epilepsy-syndromes/benign-rolandic-epilepsy.
  2. Louise C Mellish, Colin Dunkley, Colin D Ferrie, Deb K Pal. Antiepileptic drug treatment of rolandic epilepsy and Panayiotopoulos syndrome: clinical practice survey and clinical trial feasibility. Arch Dis Child. Jan 2015; 100(1):62-67. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4283698/.
  3. Ahmad K Kaddurah, MD. Benign Epilepsy of Childhood With Centrotemporal Spikes. Medscape. December 23, 2015; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1181649-overview#a7.
  4. Victor A. McKusick. Centralopathic Epilepsy. OMIM. 09/09/2015; http://www.omim.org/entry/117100.
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Basic Information

  • The Epilepsy Foundation has an information page on benign rolandic epilepsy. Click on Epilepsy Foundation to view the information page.
  • MedlinePlus was designed by the National Library of Medicine to help you research your health questions, and it provides more information about this topic.

In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. Each entry has a summary of related medical articles. It is meant for health care professionals and researchers. OMIM is maintained by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. 
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Benign rolandic epilepsy (BRE). Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Benign rolandic epilepsy of childhood (BREC)
  • Benign epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes (BECTS)
  • Benign epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes (BECCT)
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.