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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Benign rolandic epilepsy (BRE)


Other Names for this Disease
  • Benign rolandic epilepsy of childhood (BREC)
  • Benign epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes (BECTS)
  • Benign epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes (BECCT)
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Treatment

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How might benign rolandic epilepsy (BRE) be treated?

Usually treatment is not necessary because the seizure episodes are infrequent and typically end by puberty. When episodes are more frequent or occur in the daytime, antiseizure medications, such as carbamazepinephenobarbital, phenytoin, valproic acid, clonazepam, clobazam, gabapentin, and levetiracetam may be utilized. Most individuals respond to a low dose of a single drug; however rarely, a combination of different medications is needed.[1]
Last updated: 7/26/2016

References
  1. Ahmad K Kaddurah, MD. Benign Epilepsy of Childhood With Centrotemporal Spikes. Medscape. December 23, 2015; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1181649-overview#a7.


Clinical Trials & Research for this Disease

  • The Centers for Mendelian Genomics program is working to discover the causes of rare genetic disorders. For more information about applying to the research study, please visit their website.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Benign rolandic epilepsy of childhood (BREC)
  • Benign epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes (BECTS)
  • Benign epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes (BECCT)
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.