Your browser does not support javascript:   Search for gard hereSearch for news-and-events here.

Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Print friendly version

Acquired hemophilia


Other Names for this Disease
  • Acquired haemophilia
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Overview

Acquired hemophilia is a bleeding disorder that interferes with the body's blood clotting process. Although the condition can affect people of all ages, it generally occurs in older people (the median age of diagnosis is between 60 and 67 years). Signs and symptoms include prolonged bleeding, frequent nosebleeds, bruising throughout the body, solid swellings of congealed blood (hematomas), hematuria, and gastrointestinal or urologic bleeding. Acquired hemophilia occurs when the body's immune system attacks and disables a certain protein that helps the blood clot. About half of the cases are associated with other conditions, such as pregnancy, autoimmune disease, cancer, skin diseases, or allergic reactions to medications. Treatment is aimed at controlling bleeding episodes and addressing the underlying cause of the condition.[1][2]
Last updated: 7/9/2015

References

  1. Sara J Grethlein, MD. Acquired Hemophilia. Medscape Reference. November 2014; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/211186-overview.
  2. Acquired Hemophilia. NORD. 2012; https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/acquired-hemophilia/.
GARD Video Tutorials
GARD Video Tutorials
Learn how to find information on treatment, research, specialists, and more.
Contact GARD
Contact GARD
Contact a GARD Information Specialist with your questions about this condition.

Basic Information

  • Genetics Home Reference (GHR) contains information on Acquired hemophilia. This website is maintained by the National Library of Medicine.
  • The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) is a federation of more than 130 nonprofit voluntary health organizations serving people with rare disorders. Click on the link to view information on this topic.

In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for¬†information on rare diseases and orphan drugs.¬† Access to this database is free of charge.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Acquired hemophilia. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Acquired haemophilia
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.