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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Acquired hemophilia


Other Names for this Disease
  • Acquired haemophilia
  • Hemophilia, acquired
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Overview

Acquired hemophilia is a rare form of hemophilia in which the body makes specialized proteins called autoantibodies that attack and disable coagulation factors (proteins in the blood that assist with the clotting process).[1] The most common coagulation factor attacked is coagulation factor VIII, though other coagulation factors, including factor V and factor IX have been associated with the condition.[2] The production of autoantibodies is sometimes associated with pregnancy, immune system disorders (e.g., systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren syndrome), viral infections cancer, or allergic reactions to certain drugs.[1][2] In about half of cases, the cause of acquired hemophilia is unknown.[1] Treatment may vary from person to person.
Last updated: 12/5/2008

References

  1. Hemophilia. Genetics Home Reference. May 2010; http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition=hemophilia. Accessed 6/16/2011.
  2. Zeitler H, Ulrich-Merzenich G, Hess L, Konsek E, Unkrig C, Walger P, et al. Blood. 2005; http://bloodjournal.hematologylibrary.org/cgi/reprint/105/6/2287. Accessed 10/14/2008.
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Basic Information

In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for¬†information on rare diseases and orphan drugs.¬† Access to this database is free of charge.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Acquired hemophilia. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Acquired haemophilia
  • Hemophilia, acquired
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.