Your browser does not support javascript:   Search for gard hereSearch for news-and-events here.

Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Trehalase deficiency


Other Names for this Disease
  • Trehalose intolerance
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Treatment

Newline Maker

How might trehalase deficiency be treated?

There is no cure for trehalase deficiency. Treatment involves avoidance or restriction of foods that contain trehalose.[1][2] 

Trehalose is found naturally in mushrooms, algae, and insects.[3] Trehalose received the GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) status from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a food additive in 2000.[4] Since that time, trehalose has been utilized in many capacities in food production due to its chemical makeup and properties including taste enhancement, food preservation, and stabilization against heat and cold. Food products that may contain trehalose or are predicted to contain trehalose in the future include: dried foods (cereal, powdered milk, beans), frozen foods, confection (candy, gum, chocolate), confectionary (cake, jam, cream), beverages (coffee, tea, fruit juices), and fermented food (bread, yogurt). Trehalose additionally might be utilized in medical and cosmetic products.[5][6][7]
Last updated: 5/4/2016

References
  1. Swallow DM, Poulter M, Hollox EJ. Intolerance to Lactose and Other Dietary Sugars. Drug Metabolism and Disposition. 2001; http://dmd.aspetjournals.org/content/29/4/513.full.
  2. M. MONTALTO, A. GALLO, V. OJETTI, A. GASBARRINI. Fructose, trehalose and sorbitol malabsorption. European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences. 2013; 17(Suppl2):26-29. http://www.europeanreview.org/wp/wp-content/uploads/026-0291.pdf.
  3. Victor A. McKusick. Trehalase Deficiency. In: Marla J. F. O'Neill. Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM). 2010; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/dispomim.cgi?id=612119. Accessed 2/4/2010.
  4. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Agency Response Letter GRAS Notice No. GRN 000045. 10/07/2014; http://www.fda.gov/Food/IngredientsPackagingLabeling/GRAS/NoticeInventory/ucm154119.htm.
  5. Abbott PJ, Chen J. WHO Food Additives Series 46: Trehalose. International Programme on Chemical Safety. http://www.inchem.org/documents/jecfa/jecmono/v46je05.htm.
  6. Chiara Schiraldi, Isabella Di Lernia, Mario De Rosa. Trehalose production: exploiting novel approaches. Trends in Biotechnology. October 2002; 20(10):420-425. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12220904.
  7. Maarten Walmagh, Renfei Zhao and Tom Desmet. Trehalose Analogues: Latest Insights in Properties and Biocatalytic Production. Int.J.Mol.Sci. Jun 2015; 16(6):13729-45. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26084050.


Clinical Trials & Research for this Disease

  • The Centers for Mendelian Genomics program is working to discover the causes of rare genetic disorders. For more information about applying to the research study, please visit their website.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Trehalose intolerance
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.